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Weather Aquaponics

Weather Aquaponics

Weather poses an interesting factor in the success and affordability of your aquaponics system. Consider the ramifications of all climates that might hit your greenhouse.


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Maturity

Maturity

Urbanist Farms has been experimenting with a wide variety of produce in our aquaponic systems, including tomatoes, basil, peppers, melons, cucumbers, eggplant, broccoli, chard, kale, peas, and more. But it only grows koi and goldfish. We don’t kill our biggest helpers!

Aquaponic systems mature over time. They grow richer with a spectrum of macro and micronutrients. So if you think the tomatoes taste good this year, they’ll be even better next year.


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Futurist Farmer

Futurist Farmer

On the horizon, Urbanist Farms is looking to start a venture that would establish a large aquaponic CSA program offering weekly boxes of fresh produce and fish. We’re presently looking for funding to make that goal, and a handful of other large-scale projects, a reality. For now, in addition to consulting and building aquaponics systems, we plan soon to sell plant starts and produce at farmers’ markets and a limited amount of microgreens through direct-sale relationships.

Every week is better than the last. We are very optimistic about the future of aquaponics and its ability to help feed our growing population sustainably.


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A Hard Days Work

A Hard Days Work

In aquaponics, what’s good for the bottom line is good for the earth as well. With hydroponics, fertilizers build up over time, requiring water to be changed periodically. Similarly, with aquaculture, water must also be changed periodically to address ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate buildups.

Combining hydroponics and aquaculture cancels out the downsides of each. Through beneficial bacteria in the media — lava cinders in our case — the ammonia generated by fish is naturally converted into nitrates that are used by plants for vigorous growth. The plant roots filter the water for the fish, and the cycle repeats.


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Snapshot From Seattle

Snapshot From Seattle

Over the life of an aquaponic system, it is the cheapest and among the most sustainable ways to farm.

While startup costs can be pricey, maintaining an aquaponic system costs relatively little in comparison to soil-based agriculture, hydroponics (raising plants in water with added nutrients), or aquaculture (raising fish alone). Typical expenses, such as irrigation and hydroponic fertilizers, are minimized or eliminated with aquaponics due to the symbiotic nature of the operation between fish and plants. Moreover, by recirculating water that is not used by the plants, aquaponic systems can conserve over 90 percent of the water traditionally used in soil-based agriculture and aquaculture.


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Flowers, too

Flowers, too

Tired of lettuce? Grow flowers in your aquaponics system.


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Greenhouse Insects

Greenhouse Insects

Ah, those pesky flying friends who love our growing greens as much as we do. They love to squeeze in to the greenhouse and mill around in the humid warmth, sipping on the live force of our new leaves.

Never forget – spiders are welcome. They are natures Raid.


next page

Weather Aquaponics

Weather poses an interesting factor in the success and affordability of your aquaponics system. Consider the ramifications of all climates that might hit your...
article post

Maturity

Urbanist Farms has been experimenting with a wide variety of produce in our aquaponic systems, including tomatoes, basil, peppers, melons, cucumbers, eggplant, broccoli, chard, kale, peas, and more. But it only grows koi and goldfish. We don’t kill our biggest helpers! Aquaponic systems mature over time. They grow richer with a spectrum of macro and micronutrients. So if you think the tomatoes taste good this year, they’ll be even better next...
article post

Futurist Farmer

On the horizon, Urbanist Farms is looking to start a venture that would establish a large aquaponic CSA program offering weekly boxes of fresh produce and fish. We’re presently looking for funding to make that goal, and a handful of other large-scale projects, a reality. For now, in addition to consulting and building aquaponics systems, we plan soon to sell plant starts and produce at farmers’ markets and a limited amount of microgreens through direct-sale relationships. Every week is better than the last. We are very optimistic about the...
article post

A Hard Days Work

In aquaponics, what’s good for the bottom line is good for the earth as well. With hydroponics, fertilizers build up over time, requiring water to be changed periodically. Similarly, with aquaculture, water must also be changed periodically to address ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate buildups. Combining hydroponics and aquaculture cancels out the downsides of each. Through beneficial bacteria in the media — lava cinders in our case — the ammonia generated by fish is naturally converted into nitrates that are used by plants for vigorous growth. The plant roots filter...
article post

Snapshot From Seattle

Over the life of an aquaponic system, it is the cheapest and among the most sustainable ways to farm. While startup costs can be pricey, maintaining an aquaponic system costs relatively little in comparison to soil-based agriculture, hydroponics (raising plants in water with added nutrients), or aquaculture (raising fish alone). Typical expenses, such as irrigation and hydroponic fertilizers, are minimized or eliminated with aquaponics due to the symbiotic nature of the operation between fish and plants. Moreover, by recirculating water that is not used by the plants, aquaponic systems...
article post

Flowers, too

Tired of lettuce? Grow flowers in your aquaponics system.
article post

Greenhouse Insects

Ah, those pesky flying friends who love our growing greens as much as we do. They love to squeeze in to the greenhouse and mill around in the humid warmth, sipping on the live force of our new leaves. Never forget – spiders are welcome. They are natures...
article post